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Is Empathy Always a Good Thing?

Is Empathy Always a Good Thing?

Hello All!

I know from talking to friends and colleagues that many of us are working within our organizations to address wide-spread burnout while also experiencing it ourselves. This is, in some ways, the predictable result of an already-strapped workforce working through an 18 month public health crisis. It is also likely in part due to the empathic distress we feel for those we are serving.

Perhaps surprisingly, empathy can actually contribute to burnout. Many of us may have felt at one time that we have too much empathy or that it is too painful to “feel” for so many people so much of the time. I know I have felt this! Many of us who are in the helping professions were drawn to the field precisely because we feel so deeply for others and desire to alleviate their suffering.

How can we be deeply empathic and not drained?

Empathy is complex. Understanding more about it, including both the upsides and downsides can be helpful. When we are aware of the different types of empathy and when we are experiencing them, we can make more intentional decisions about how to manage it. This helps us be more effective with others while also taking care of ourselves.

We can think of empathy in two buckets: affective (or emotional) empathy, and cognitive (or perspective-taking) empathy.

Affective empathy is when we actually feel the same thing others are feeling. If our client feels hopeless and sad, we too feel sad and hopeless. When our child’s feelings have been hurt by a friend, we too feel hurt when they tell us about it.

Helpful aspects of affective empathy: When we feel the distress of another, this can spur us to action; if we feel pain when others are in pain, we may be more apt to try and comfort them or take action to protect them. Imagine the urgency to rescue a harmed animal or protest family separation policies after seeing crying children and mothers.

Likewise, when we feel the positive emotions that others feel, such as elation or happiness, this can also create a deep connection. Imagine the collective euphoria at exciting sporting events or the love felt when you are joyful with a family member over their good news.

Downsides of affective empathy: When we feel distress, sadness and other painful emotions that others are feeling, it activates the pain centers in our brain. It can be heavy and draining. For helping professionals, it can lead to burnout as we get overwhelmed or experience numbness (“empathy fatigue”) as we try to distance ourselves from the feelings. Affective empathy can also contribute discrimination, as we tend to ‘feel’ most for others in our affinity group.

Interestingly, there is good research that affective empathy is also often not perceived as truly caring by others. Imagine a friend sharing with us that they are upset and we become equally upset. When this happens, we don’t feel like a “safe harbor” that they can to talk to; we may stop listening attentively, dive in to give advice, try to “fix” their problems or dismiss it, to lower the pain we are feeling.

Cognitive empathy (or perspective taking) is when we imagine what others feel; we take their perspective; we try to understand what they are feeling or going through. This type of empathy is characterized by curiosity and imagination and often driven by a value of non-judgment.

Helpful aspects of cognitive empathy: It is unlimited! We can try and understand anyone in any situation. We can imagine how people are very different form us and how they might do, say or believe things that are totally different from our own experience.

This type of empathy actually lights up reward centers in our brains- it makes us feel closer to people, more connected. For helping professionals, it is related to job satisfaction and is a protective factor against burnout.

Downsides to cognitive empathy: Sometimes imagining why or how someone might do or think something, keeps us from being able to draw boundaries, set limits, leave relationships or otherwise say “no” to them. Imagine always “understanding” where someone’s abusive behavior comes from. This can definitely keep us from limit-setting if we can always find a way to rationalize or dismiss their behavior.

I created a graphic that shows evidenced-based (and practice-based) strategies to move in and out of these types of empathy, intentionally. You can find it here or on rsourced.com under “empathy and stigma”. I would love to hear what you all think of these concepts!

As we are cautiously seeing each other a bit more, wishing you all many smiles and bear hugs 😉


https://www.emorrisonconsulting.com/ 

P.S. For all of you on this list who are Motivational Interviewing Facilitators or for anyone who does any type of training: there is a new resource for ensuring we are facilitating Trauma Informed Workshops (Zoom and In-person) that I hope might be useful to you all. You can find it here, or on rsourced.com under Motivational Interviewing Facilitators.

P.P.S For anyone who would like to see any research referenced here, please see the MI and Empathy bibliographies on Rsourced, or just email me!

Whole Person Workplaces

Whole Person Workplaces 

Hello All!

I gave a plenary talk recently at the excellent UCLA ISAP conference, and spoke about how many times I’ve avoided talking about my own behavioral health in the workplace. When I looked back at my career, often I had outright lied rather than disclose mental health or substance use disorder struggles of my own, or my family’s. And all my workplaces have been in health and social services!

In some ways it seems normal; most of us have been raised to separate work and our personal lives (this artificial separation has many patriarchal attributes), we all have different levels of comfort with self-disclosure, and of course, when disclosures concern our family members, we take their wishes around privacy into consideration. The more I reflected on my own lack of disclosures though, it became clear that my omissions were more about stigma than any of these things. This insight became clear when I noticed the difference between my comfort in disclosing what were considered ‘physical’ conditions, vs. those that were considered behavioral health.

I’d never disclosed the harrowing four months my husband underwent ECT for depression; although years later I didn’t hesitate to share at work when he’d been diagnosed with a treatable cancer. Neither decision had been about my husband’s preferences. He always said he didn’t mind me telling anyone either of these things. I’d been very open about my lower back going out twice in one year, sharing freely even with those who hadn’t asked; while in contrast I facilitated an entire staff meeting on post-partum depression, never disclosing taking anti-depressants for three years after my son was born. I called my daughter into school ‘sick’ when she was suffering from depression so badly she sat on the couch and cried in her pajamas.

And I know I’m not alone. Most of us don’t talk about behavioral health at work – even in health care work environments. Mind Share Partners did a wonderful report on mental health at work; what they found won’t surprise most of us: 60% of us experience mental health difficulties that affect us at work – and the same percentage, 60%, had never talked to anyone at work about mental health.

Our health and social care organizations can lead the way for other fields in inviting the emotional health of all our employees into the organization culture and conversation. We can ensure that we talk about mental health and substance use disorders as much as we talk about traditionally physical conditions.

I’ve committed to disclosing honestly about behavioral health in everyday conversation, especially at work. I’ve noticed when I do so, often others are quick to share as well and the conversations are richer for it. Recently I was at a wedding when someone I work with asked me what my husband does since he is retired. I took a deep breath and said he goes to AA meetings and socializes with his buddies in the fellowship. They shared about someone in their family in active addition. When I was in the early stages of discussing work with a new colleague, around obesity, I pushed myself to tell her I had a history of an eating disorder, and consider myself in recovery in that area. She then shared with me her history of obesity, and the stigma she has endured in health care services.

What we are silent about often strengthens the stigma around it; I’ve come to believe that it can be an act of social justice, just telling the truth about what we experience.
Wishing all of you well, and I’d love to hear from you!


https://www.emorrisonconsulting.com/ 

I have been interviewed on a few podcasts recently, both about communication in healthcare. The first is on Healthcare Communications: Effective Techniques for Clinicians. You can check it out HERE.

The second is on Complex Care Today about the Power of Motivational Interviewing. Listen to it HERE.

“Bring your whole self to work. I don’t believe we have a professional self Monday through Friday and a real self the rest of the time. It is all professional and it is all personal.” – Sheryl Sandberg

Relational Screenings

Relational Screening

My son wet the bed every night until he was 10 years old. When his friend group started having sleepovers, we had ongoing conversations about who he was going to tell and who he was not.  He identified clues about his peers’ levels of trustworthiness. He felt he could tell a friend who had been nice to him when he was crying before. He decided he wouldn’t tell another friend who he had observed talking poorly about another peer. Once, he even ranked his peer group for me from most trustworthy to least trustworthy, based on some very minute and subtle behaviors.

We all engage in this process of assessing the trustworthiness of others. We make rapid, sometimes unconscious, decisions about who we can disclose to safely and what we are comfortable disclosing.  When asked if we are married, we might not share that we are newly divorced if the person asking us doesn’t make eye contact, interrupts us, or checks their phone during the conversation. We remember these cues about trustworthiness too. For example, we might tell our doctor that our 12 month old is off the bottle, even though he isn’t, because it’s the same doctor who told us at the last visit that we shouldn’t have our baby sleep with us in the bed, while looking down at his files.

Okay, that last one was me…and I’m not alone.  Research indicates the majority of us (61-81% in one study) withhold some important health information from our care team and that one of the primary reasons we do this is to avoid judgment. In some ways, this isn’t necessarily a problem. When it comes to our personal lives and health, we get to decide who we tell and what we tell. When we decide not to share, it is often because we have picked up on something that indicates we would be judged for doing so. In that sense, in the moment, we make a wise decision to protect ourselves.

Still, there are real consequences if our health systems, clinic environments, or interpersonal ways of interacting are barriers to patients feeling comfortable with sharing openly.  Over 85% of the information needed for accurate diagnosis and treatment recommendations come from self-disclosures.  We also know that the process of self-disclosure, when met with acceptance and empathy, can be healing all by itself.

We now routinely ask patients about things that are increasingly personal and even historically stigmatized- substance use, mental health symptoms, trauma in childhood, intimate partner violence and more. For this reason, its more important now than ever to understand how we can ensure our patients feel comfortable sharing with us when we ask these questions.

Relational Screening means developing a relationship with patients as people, before engaging them in a transactional exchange, such as closed-question, agenda-driven, screening.  We can use names, both ours and theirs, and ask about their day. We can purposely use humor, genuine compliments or other connecting strategies to engage with them as fellow humans before starting the screening process (saying something like, “I love your necklace!” Or “How is your daughter doing?”). We can focus on normalizing one’s circumstances (one medical assistant I work with always says, “I’ve got lots of stuffWe all have stuff”), acknowledging the difficulty of some questions (“I know, right? These questions are super personal.”), and most importantly, identifying their strengths (highlighting, “I’m so impressed with your openness. I can hear how much effort you put toward being a good mom” or “I can hear how much you care about your health.”). We can conclude with showing appreciation for what they have just said, even with a brief “thank you for sharing this with us”.

All these strategies are so simple and… not necessarily easy.  Our health and social systems are often not set up to be supportive of relational screening with time pressures, EHR check boxes, and often minimal resourcing for support staff.  Engaging with patients in conversational, empathic  screening is actually a radical act, in that it mitigates power differentials and prioritizes relationships.  For all of you out there that are engaging in relational screening yourselves (and/or supporting staff at your organization in relational screening practices), you are doing incredibly important work!

I’d love to hear your experiences, barriers and strategies in relational-screening practices.  You can reply to this email, or email me at: elizabeth@emorrisonconsulting.com.

For free resources on relational screening, such as workbooks, videos and conversation guides, you can go to www.rsourced.com and click on the Telehealth tab. There, you’ll find a guide book for medical assistants and others who screen patients, another one for the providers who have follow up conversations after there is a positive screen and much more.

Wishing you all well as 2020 winds to a close,


https://www.emorrisonconsulting.com/ 

 

Empathic Environments and Social Justice

July 2020

Hello Friends!

Like most of you, I am sure, the horrific, public murder of George Floyd and the subsequent racial justice protests have driven me to re-evaluate what I am doing personally and professionally to dismantle racism, and truly achieve equitable health and health care for all. I’ve recommitted to my own practice of unflinching self-reflection on my own biases and privilege and to mitigating both; I’m also rededicating myself to the transforming all health, social care, and public service settings into empathic, dignified, respectful environments.

Many of us work at organizations with safe, beautiful, and compassionate environments; and some of us may work at organizations that might inadvertently be engaging in practices that contribute to an unfriendly or even authoritarian environment for the people we serve – many of whom are people of color. It isn’t uncommon that our helping organizations employ private security guards who stand in uniform in our waiting rooms or emergency rooms. They sometimes have weapons, including pepper spray, batons, tasers and guns. Some of us have glass in front of our receptionists (long before COVID), automatic locking doors between the front and back offices, and command signs that indicate a power differential, such as the pictures above, taken at a health clinic.

Unfortunately, for people who have historically experienced police as authoritarian, violent or punishing – such as those with severe mental illnesses, Black people and other people of color – the above “safety enhancements” can contribute to a perception of, and eventuality of, violence, in the very place that is meant to support wellbeing, provide help, and value equity. Minimally, they can signal an unfriendly and unequal relationship to those we serve. Waiting in guarded areas with rules on the walls becomes a social justice issue when we consider how rarely those with private insurance encounter this.

None of us would purposefully create an authoritarian relationship with our patients and in fact, the motivation for implementing these practices is noble – to keep our staff and patients safe. This moment offers us an opportunity to reconsider if security guards, glass partitions and “no cell phone” signs reflect the type of relationships we want to have with the communities we serve. Just as the national discourse is considering how the money devoted to policing neighborhoods might be more effectively spent on enriching and supporting the community, we too might imagine different, creative and relational strategies to ensure the safety and wellbeing of our patients and staff in the waiting room. I would welcome hearing your thoughts on this important topic! Please feel free to respond to this email if you’d like to share.

And…. we have many new resources:

Empathic Physical Environments: As in-person visits start to increase in our clinics, many of us want to make sure our physical environment communicates empathy to our patients. This Empathy Opportunity Map shows some of the different points where we can show care for our patients.

Conducting Sensitive Screenings: My clinic asked me to make a video to help medical assistants conducting sensitive screenings on the telephone and video. In this new video, I demonstrate reflective listening, affirming and other short, empathic responses while conducting ACE, AUDIT and PHQ-9 screening.

Empathic Relationships via Video: I recently started therapy again, giving me the experience of meeting a therapist for the first time via Zoom. ‘Considerations, Tips and Thoughts on Video Sessions’, shares practical tips for developing and maintaining empathic relationships via video. I drew on my experience as a telehealth clinician, as a telehealth therapy patient, and the wisdom of two clinicians on my team, Lizzie Horevitz PhD LCSW and Erica Palmer LCSW.

Motivational Interviewing: For those of you who are MI trainers, we have many new resources including 16 new, short videos, each demonstrating different MI skills (thank you to Holly Hughes LCSW for providing the space, sharing one of her therapists for the videos, and being in the videos herself!). Updated MI slide decks now include telephone and video considerations, there are suggestions on conducting MI workshops virtually, and much more. These MI resources and more are now also on the Center for Care Innovation’s webpage.

Wishing all of you well!

Elizabeth
www.emorrisonconsulting.com

IBH Resources in the Time of COVID-19

“I prefer to think of my patients and myself as fellow travelers, a term that abolishes distinctions between ‘them’ (the afflicted) and ‘us’ (the healers)…. We are all in this together, and there is no therapist and no person immune to the inherent tragedies of existence.”

– Irving Yalom


Hello All!

This week, like all of you I am sure, I’ve needed to employ my very best communication skills. I engaged in motivational interviewing skills to help my 80 year old mother make the decision to forego her weekly bowling league and spent the day yesterday listening, normalizing, and empathizing with the staff and patients at my clinic, who were struggling with a wide range of fears: others’ panic-driven behaviors, ICE activity, vulnerability of elderly parents, and always…  economic uncertainty.

Since most of us have already moved this week to partially delivering patient care by phone (or video conference), I wanted to send along some telephone-specific empathic communication strategies, in case it is helpful to you or your colleagues. You can scroll down to see this information or, if you’d like a PDF you can download it HERE. It’s also available on my resources website, under the Empathy & Stigma tab.

Many of us are BH leaders and clinicians, and have been scrambling to understand the legislative, operational, logistical,  legal and clinical considerations in delivering these phone and video-based behavioral health services.

Please join us for a free webinar on Friday March 27, 12:30pm – 1:30pm PST addressing these important issues:

Link: https://www.gotomeet.me/ElizabethMorrison 

You can also dial in using your phone.

United States: +1 (312) 757-3129

Access Code: 841-343-917

Lizzie Horevitz PhD, LCSW, Chief Behavioral Health Officer at Marin Community Clinics and Lead Consultant for EM Consulting will share her on the-ground knowledge and tips for consent, billing and documentation. Elizabeth and Lizzie will also facilitate a discussion about clinical best practices on telephone and video services, so bring your questions and your expertise to share! Feel free to share the webinar information with anyone you think would benefit.

I’m thinking about all of you warmly, my fellow helping professionals- sending care and good energy to you all as you care for your families, patients and communities.

Elizabeth

CEO & Principal Consultant

www.emorrisonconsulting.com


When We Can’t See Each Other:

Empathic Communication on the Phone

Most of us, at some point, have read that body language accounts for the majority of communication. This is accurate!  Studies have found that when we are communicating with someone, words account for about 10% of the overall message. Tone of voice accounts for about 40%, and body language accounts for the remaining 50%.

As helping professionals (and as family members!) we likely unconsciously and consciously show care and empathy during conversations by maintaining eye contact, mirroring others facial expressions and mood, leaning towards them, smiling, nodding, and sometimes touching them.

As people who understand the deep importance of empathic communication in relationship-based care, and the development and maintenance of the therapeutic alliance, how can we mitigate the loss of 50% of our communication, in order to continue to be effective, helpful therapists?

The following are some tips, hints and tricks for engaging in high quality, connected conversations on the phone – with patients, or family members and friends.

  • Set the foundation:  This is the most important sentence in this document: We are unable to listen and communicate skillfully when we are doing something else.  Avoid talking on the phone while looking at a computer, paperwork, or anything else that draws attention.  Avoid typing while communicating on the phone.  For me, looking down at my lap works the best, helping me focus just on the person I’m talking to.  Sometimes walking outside can work well too, as long as the walk is quiet and doesn’t take any concentration.
  • Demonstrate attentiveness to other’s comfort: When someone is with us physically, we can assume it was a time that worked for them, and that they are alone. On the phone, it is important to begin by asking if this is still a good time to talk, and if they are comfortable. Asking whether they feel they have sufficient privacy is important too.
  • Normalize: Initiate a conversation about the experience and process of phone communication. Just saying ‘I know it is a bit different, for us to engage in therapy/counseling/a visit this way. It can feel pretty odd. What are your thoughts, questions or concerns?’ We can also check in at the end, to ask about the experience.
  • Reflecting listening becomes much more important, as we lose nodding and eye contact as ways to convey deep listening. Reflective listening is one of the empathic communication techniques that takes the most practice and skill to use effectively. If you’ve shied away from it before, telephone conversations are the time to dive in. Ideally, we are reflecting through summarizing, exact words, and double-sided reflections. Just as a reminder, reflective listening is repeating back to another what our understanding is of what they’ve said. It can start with stems like:
      • It sounds like what you are saying is …
      • What I hear you saying is…
  •  However, stems aren’t necessary.  We can also just repeat back important words or phrases they’ve used:
      • You just wanted a few more years with your grandson…
      • You are devastated by the loss….

For more detail on this valuable, and somewhat difficult skill, see the resources listed at the end of this document.

  • Jump in quickly, to check in.  When we hear the other person trail off, move around; when they are answering open ended questions with one word answers, or there are long silences, we likely were unable to see the earlier cues and clues about how they are responding to the conversation. By the time we actually ‘hear’ this, it is time to say something. For example: ‘I wonder how you are feeling right now in this moment?‘
  • Narrate your pauses and process.  In person, others can see us look down thoughtfully, nod, look to the sky in consideration… on the phone, it is just silence, which might be misinterpreted.  Comments like ‘I’m just thinking about what you just shared…’  or ‘I want to sit with that, for just a minute. It sounds so important, what you just said’ help convey we are still with the other person, and gives the other a visual picture of us in thought.
  • Narrate your smile.  We convey an enormous amount of goodwill, physically, by smiling, close proximity and eye contact.  When we smile, for example, at the beginning of the conversation, or in response to what someone is saying, we can verbalize this. ‘I’m happy to be talking to you today; and ‘I have a big smile on my face right now, hearing you say that’.
  • Affirm strengths more often.  Others are more vulnerable when they can’t see us. They can’t immediately ‘see’ how we are responding to them, or how much we care. Particularly with people we don’t have a long history with us, affirming strengths is a powerhouse when it comes to conveying of empathy and non-judgment.  Stating things like ‘I’m so impressed you were willing to give this phone thing a try’ or ‘I can hear how much effort you are making to keep your family safe during this time’ frequently can assure others we have positive regard for them.

For more detail on these and other empathic communication strategies, see www.emorrisonconsulting.com, under the resources tab.
Feel free to share, attribution is appreciated but not necessary.  If you’d like a Word version of this, to alter and edit, please email me at: elizabeth@emorrisonconconsulting.com

Welcome To My First Newsletter!

October 2019

Hello Friends!

You are receiving this email because we have worked together, in some way, to
foster and support human connections in health care. Some of you I’ve worked
with around empathic communication such as The Empathy Effect or
Motivational Interviewing Workshops, and for many of you, around behavioral
health integration and other whole-person care efforts. As I was looking at the
list of names for this email, I felt very grateful to be connected to so many
amazing people, doing such important work!

My intention for this newsletter is to further connect those of us who are
committed to transforming our health and social systems from systems that are
too often transactional, de-humanizing, and unjust, to relational, empathic and
equitable systems that enhance our sense of shared humanity. This
transformation in the health and social services parallels the same struggle in
our communities and in our country.

Humanizing systems is social justice work, and if there ever was a time for
us to be bold, relentless, strong and effective in our aims, it is now. When I am
flagging, when cynicism creeps in, when I start to feel hopeless and sometimes
helpless about what I can do, one of the only things that seems to provide more
motivation, energy, comfort and the willingness to get busy again doing the best
work I can, is feeling connected to others who have similar values and aims.

Please continue reading below for some resources I’ve developed to help in
this work. I appreciate connecting with you all in this new way.

Bye for now!

Elizabeth
CEO & Principal Consultant

www.emorrisonconsulting.com


I have a website just for resources that I’ve created, or I found and feel are particularly valuable. You can check it out HERE. Everything on the site is for fun and for free, as they say in AA! One of the resources I love the most is the ‘101’ slide decks. I created these with my frequent collaborator, graphic designer Illiya Vestica, to try and capture the essence of the many strategies we engage in to humanize health care. I envisioned them as tools for us to use within our organizations to increase understanding and emotional connection for engaging in the complex work of systems change.

 

 

Learn how to transform the most impactful part of the treatment experience. Read More »

 

 

 

 

Download resources for motivational interviewing for practitioners and trainers. Read More »

 

 


“When someone really hears you without passing judgment on
you, without trying to take responsibility for you, without trying to
mold you, it feels damn good!” – Carl Rogers

Whole Person Workplaces

December 2019

Hello All!

I gave a plenary talk recently at the excellent UCLA ISAP conference, and spoke
about how many times I’ve avoided talking about my own behavioral health in the
workplace. When I looked back at my career, often I had outright lied rather than
disclose mental health or substance use disorder struggles of my own, or my
family’s. And all my workplaces have been in health and social services!
In some ways it seems normal; most of us have been raised to separate work and
our personal lives (this artificial separation has many patriarchal attributes), we all
have different levels of comfort with self-disclosure, and of course, when disclosures
concern our family members, we take their wishes around privacy into
consideration. The more I reflected on my own lack of disclosures though, it became
clear that my omissions were more about stigma than any of these things. This
insight became clear when I noticed the difference between my comfort in disclosing
what were considered ‘physical’ conditions, vs. those that were considered
behavioral health.

I’d never disclosed the harrowing four months my husband underwent ECT for
depression; although years later I didn’t hesitate to share at work when he’d been
diagnosed with a treatable cancer. Neither decision had been about my husband’s
preferences. He always said he didn’t mind me telling anyone either of these
things. I’d been very open about my lower back going out twice in one year, sharing
freely even with those who hadn’t asked; while in contrast I facilitated an entire staff
meeting on post-partum depression, never disclosing taking anti-depressants for
three years after my son was born. I called my daughter into school ‘sick’ when she
was suffering from depression so badly she sat on the couch and cried in her
pajamas.

And I know I’m not alone. Most of us don’t talk about behavioral health at work –
even in health care work environments. Mind Share Partners did a wonderful report
on mental health at work; what they found won’t surprise most of us: 60% of us
experience mental health difficulties that affect us at work – and the same
percentage, 60%, had never talked to anyone at work about mental health.
Our health and social care organizations can lead the way for other fields in inviting
the emotional health of all our employees into the organization culture and
conversation. We can ensure that we talk about mental health and substance use
disorders as much as we talk about traditionally physical conditions.

I’ve committed to disclosing honestly about behavioral health in everyday
conversation, especially at work. I’ve noticed when I do so, often others are quick to
share as well and the conversations are richer for it. Recently I was at a wedding
when someone I work with asked me what my husband does since he is retired. I
took a deep breath and said he goes to AA meetings and socializes with his buddies
in the fellowship. They shared about someone in their family in active addition. When
I was in the early stages of discussing work with a new colleague, around obesity, I
pushed myself to tell her I had a history of an eating disorder, and consider myself in
recovery in that area. She then shared with me her history of obesity, and the stigma
she has endured in health care services.

What we are silent about often strengthens the stigma around it; I’ve come to believe
that it can be an act of social justice, just telling the truth about what we experience.

Wishing all of you well, and I’d love to hear from you!

Elizabeth

CEO & Principal Consultant
www.emorrisonconsulting.com


 

I have been interviewed on a few podcasts recently, both about communication in healthcare. The first is on Healthcare Communications: Effective Techniques for Clinicians. You can check it out HERE. The second is on Complex Care Today about the Power of Motivational Interviewing.
Listen to it HERE.

 


Bring your whole self to work. I don’t believe we have a
professional self Monday through Friday and a real self the
rest of the time. It is all professional and it is all
personal.” – Sheryl Sandberg

introduction blog post hero

Welcome to Rsourced

On the scale of lacking organization to highly organized, I fall someplace on the lower end.

From the time I was small, a good portion of each day is spent simply looking for things- my son’s permission slip, a tape measure, a PowerPoint presentation on my computer.

I was 22 when I first used email, and it made the job of looking for things on my computer much easier- as long as I could remember who I sent something to, I could search email and find the file- and send it out again to whoever requested it. 26 years later, not only is my memory more crowded with important things to recall (passwords, birthday parties my kids are invited to this month, things I need from CVS this week), my computer is significantly more crowded with resources, tools, and writings from decades of deep and passionate engagement in my work in healthcare.

I’ve been lucky to work my entire career in non-profit healthcare- a field that is driven by like-minded people, working toward social justice and looking through a health equity lens.

The people I’ve worked with and for, and the projects, pilots and initiatives I’ve been privileged to work on, have generated the creation of many resources. The purpose of this website is twofold: first, to have a central place to store originally created documents and other resources for organizations that EM Consulting is working with, for ease and simplicity; and second, to make these available to anyone or any other organization that may benefit from their use. Please feel free to email me if you’d like a non-PDF version of these materials, to make editing or altering easier. These are not copyrighted, credit is appreciated, but not necessary.

We are all working for the greater good!